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Sunday, May 17, 2015

Thank You, Venezuela!

In a press conference after receiving the new Venezuelan ambassador to Greece, the Greek Minister of Productive Reconstruction, Environment and Energy "expressed his appreciation of the pioneering role of the Venezuelan government in the anti-imperialist struggle, not only in Latin America, but for the entire world”.

Well, then, onward you move, comrades!

21 comments:

  1. Well, Greece, be prepared on what you tolerate now. Where is YOUR voice, Greeks? Are you aware of the impact of this short message on your and your children's future?
    This news was already in the media, before today. Two politicians were shaking hands.

    This here, this post about these two politicians, is the first in the media, (and I search everywhere, daily, constantly, for news about Greece), that has an unseen attached file. It is an exclamation mark of dimensions. Did you sense it? I did.

    It should be Greece's scream. Loud.

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  2. I can't see where the novelty is... In the pre-electoral period, while Mr. Kastner was praising Tsipras' speeches and his program, i had posted in this blog, a special night organized by a local SYRIZA association with guest star the Venezuelan ambassador in Greece, who would analyze to the exstatic syriza crowd, how Chavez managed the oil economy in his country. Apparently to get inspiration and ideas for Greece.

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  3. Antoinennte, don't worry, get fussy and hurry, it's a minute or two to two two ;)

    Only after default of Greece (intended by Syriza) you will read the news you expect...

    H.Trickler

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    Replies
    1. @ H. Trickler.

      I am almost prepared to agree with your theory, but why do they make it so long drawn out? They could just have defaulted on the IMF-loan last Tuesday. Why all these charades and phony "negotiation" games?

      Delete
    2. @AnonymousMay 17, 2015 at 6:27 PM

      Remember the only rule of the current blame game:

      Whoever looks guilty for the outcome (that btw everybody is waiting for months now) will be killed by the international public opinion.

      H.Trickler

      Delete
    3. @ H. Trickler,

      I am afraid that once more you will have to wait further. Tsipras won't default. Until the next time.

      Delete
  4. This shows once again which sort of people are now ruling in Greece. It is hard to understand why the other European countries should continue to finance such a regime.

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    Replies
    1. It's not hard to understand. Greece defaults, billions of euros in losses for the creditors.

      Delete
    2. Yeah,

      but it would be worth it. Greece can never be trusted again.

      Delete
    3. In 2012 article:

      "Second, the precedent of the "[Greek Bond] "restructuring, in which private creditors were forced to exchange and public lenders, such as the other euro-zone countries, weren't, gives many pause that private holders will be at the bottom of the totem pole again in another default."

      http://www.wsj.com/articles/SB10001424052702304537904577276923038574852

      "New Greek Bonds, Same Old Doubts
      Prices of New Debt Keep the Country Deep in the Realm of Highly Speculative Investments; an 18.6% Yield", By CHARLES FORELLE, Wall Street Journal online, Updated March 13, 2012 7:40 a.m. ET

      Delete
  5. Thought you might like to watch this.
    Is austerity winning the argument on ‘euro-zone’ recovery? LSE Hellenic Observatory

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ft9idB6SJ4o

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  6. Yes, good arguments for austerity. Thanks.

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    Replies
    1. Are you joking? I have never heard such a collection of ludicrous assertions claimed as "facts" in my entire life -- from a German economist in a bank, of course.

      The claim that there was economic recovery in Greece from 2012 is just a blatant lie and propaganda. The idea that fiscal contraction could be counterbalanced by economic progress of the long-run variety is just a fairy tale, dreamed up by some idiots. The claim that Greece needs a flat tax (yet producing the same income for the state as in the recent past) is bizarre: only a far right economist could make such a recommendation. Overall, that guy shows that he understands NOTHING about the Greek economy and very little about economics generally. Moreover, his comments on the "wonderful" state of the UK labour market indicate that he is off his head, in a very right wing neoliberal way.

      I listened to the journalist, the first speaker, whose ideas about the politics of austerity I largely agree with. This whole austerity debate is not about economics but about the bad political management of Europe.

      I cannot be bothered listening to some half-wit (Xafa) who was a political appointment on the IMF board -- we know the right wing rubbish that they come up with. Even the good economists of the IMF have made terrible mistakes with Greece, but the politicos are just in cloud cuckoo land.

      So, if that's the best the austerity proponents can come up with, it is fairly clear that they have lost the intellectual case. Austerity is imposed by the Germans through political and financial power: it is not a rational policy.

      Delete
    2. So what options besides austerity did Greece have?

      I agree that austerity is madness when imposed on a country with a sound underlying economy, but clearly Greece did not have a viable economy in 2009. The budget deficit was close to 15 percent, the chronic current account deficit had grown larger than the income from tourism and shipping combined, and the population was determined (and still is today) to keep the Euro no matter what. For some reason, anti-austerians never mention these facts.

      Venezuelan economist Ricardo Hausmann, predicted four years ago a further 25 percent drop in Greek GDP unless the previous inflow of capital, in form of foreign loans, were to be offset by an increase in exports. The current crisis is just the consequence of Greece having to adjust its living standard to its productive capacity. Being one of the least dynamic economies in Europe and not having your own currency makes that process a lot more painful.

      /Stockholm observer

      Delete
  7. Just a short side comment. Today, I read about Varoufakis' proposal that the ESM should repay the Greek bonds maturing soon. The ESM should call that an advance to Greece which Greece will 'repay later'. It's being considered by some as a very good proposal.

    I am beginning to believe that Varoufakis will have a good chance for a Nobel Prize. A Nobel Prize in the category of "how can I get other people's money without them being aware of it".

    Greece's financial problem is that the EU - via the Eurogroup - is not lending the money which Greece needs, among others, to repay the maturing bonds. So Greece goes to another entity of the EU - the ESM - and asks the EU to lend money from one pocket which the EU is not prepared to lend through another pocket.

    Either this proposal will become an instrument for everyone to save face or it will go on the record for having been one of the most naive proposals ever made.

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    Replies
    1. Given that this trick, of taking money from one pocket and quietly putting it into another, is exactly how the Troika has handled the eurozone crisis, I see nothing wrong with using it against them. Varoufakis argued on a rational basis for a reformulation of policy, and was rebuffed with non-rational argumentation. He now behaves like the idiots running the eurozone: good for him!

      Delete
    2. As long as not too many Europeans start behaving like Varoufakis, things will continue fine.

      Delete
    3. Some one said to me, "They should re-negociate the treaty."

      Delete
    4. 'I am beginning to believe that Varoufakis will have a good chance for a Nobel Prize. A Nobel Prize in the category of "how can I get other people's money without them being aware of it".'

      That prize is from a central bank. That's what they do.

      I wonder if all the governments will get together and decide to clear an even amount of bonds they hold on each other or the EU holds of each. Will I get a prize?

      When I read about economics on line I get the impression it is mostly the same. [Insert problem and theoretical discussion, bla, bla here] and the solution print, or add liquidity.

      Delete
    5. Giving the bank memorial prize to a finance minister (head of treasury) would be too obvious. Hey maybe most of us wouldn't get it.

      Hey the real Nobel was given to multiple scientists on the most important chemical reactions in the world, photosynthesis. CO2 + water + sunlight energy ----> carbohydrate chemical energy and building blocks for carbon based life. And then decades later they gave it for anti CO2 politics.

      Here is experimental evidence:
      Julia Child demonstrates carbon based life and food:
      "Julia Child Burns Food "
      https://www.youtube.com/embed/tGg4njImm0Y?rel=0&controls=0

      She showed one part of the carbon cycle.

      Green house growers use CO2 to increase growth.
      http://fifthseasongardening.com/regulating-carbon-dioxide
      http://hockeyschtick.blogspot.mx/2014/10/greenhouse-gases-do-have-profound.html
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carbon_cycle


      Oh and polar bears swim very well.

      If it works like that, he will definitely get the prize!

      Delete
  8. @ kleingut
    It's called a political solution. That is when politicians overrule all laws, promises and agreements.

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